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DavidMcCann

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About DavidMcCann

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  • Distribution
    Fedora 8

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  • Location
    London
  1. If this is a business PC, have you considered a commercial distro with support? If you want to stick with a free distro, how about Debian? Your Ubuntu experience would transfer, you can get the stable version which is very reliable, and the repository is huge. There's also the special, long-term support version of Ubuntu. I'd steer clear of Fedora if you depend on Java. I couldn't get the genuine article to work, and Fedora's IcedTea is not completely compatible.
  2. All of a sudden, one of my DVD-RAMs has become corrupted: attempting to mount gets sr 1:0:0:0: [sr0] Add. Sense: L-EC uncorrectable error end_request: I/O error, dev sr0, sector 1644 udf: udf_read_inode(ino 411) failed !bh UDF-fs: Error in udf_iget, block=139, partition=0 Partly because these disks are difficult to get, and partly because I don't like to give in, I'm trying to repair it. Here are the results so far. fsck.udf is untraceable, although mentioned on some websites. Using udftools to make a new filing system, mkudffs --media-type=dvdram /dev/sr0 give the error "trying to change types of multiple extents" (why can't developers write English?) Using growisofs -Z /dev/sr0 -udf gives the error ":-( unable to open64("/dev/sr0",O_RDWR): Read-only file system" Using mkfs.ext2 -b 2048 -F -F /dev/sr0 gives the error "/dev/sr0: Read-only file system while setting up superblock" So, I can't access the disk because it's corrupt, and I can't repair it because I can't access it. Actually I can never mount DVD-RAMs other than read-only: I have to use the "remount" option to get them read-write. Can anyone shed any light on this? System: Fedora 8
  3. When Ifsuser said "linux is a networking operating system", he meant that it is good if you ever need to expand to your own LAN. Linux was originally started to make a server/mainframe system (Unix) available to desktop computers; Windows started on desktops and then migrated to servers. As for viruses, I think two things are involved. Firstly, Linux is just less susceptible than Windows -- a matter of design. Secondly, the sort of people who write viruses seem to be Windows users! Let us know which distro you go for and how you do.
  4. Getting Java from Sun is what I did originally. I carefully followed all their instructions and Java was eventually listed in Firefox's about:plugins window. The checker at Sun reported that Java was correctly installed, but the demo didn't run, and the library server claimed that I didn't even have it. That's why I got the iced-tea version. Fedora's site does report that it still has a few bugs, so it looks like it's a case of reading my journals in the library and waiting in hope for Fedora 9. I did try to report my problems to Fedora, but I couldn't get Bugzilla to work, either!
  5. Thanks for the ideas. I found java.policy buried at /usr/lib/jvm/java-1.7.0-icedtea-1.7.0.0/jre/lib/security/. Very obvious! Adding the permission just for the website had no effect. Adding a blanket permission got rid of the error message, but left me with a blank pop-up window. The error console revealed a fatal error: init is not defined. This looks like a mistake in the applet, but is certainly down to Fedora's Java -- no-one else has reported any serious problems to the library. This is the sort of thing that always deters me from recommending Linux
  6. I'm trying to get access to on-line academic journals and I need to run a Java applet downloaded by a library's server. When I try to do this, I get an error message: java.security.AccessControlException: access denied (java.net.SocketPermission appserve.londonlibrary.co.uk resolve) at java.security.AccessControlContext.checkPermission(AccessControlContext.java:342 ) at java.security.AccessController.checkPermission(AccessController.java:556) at java.lang.SecurityManager.checkPermission(SecurityManager.java:550) at java.lang.SecurityManager.checkConnect(SecurityManager.java:1049) at java.net.InetAddress.getAllByName0(InetAddress.java:1192) at java.net.InetAddress.getAllByName0(InetAddress.java:1173) at java.net.InetAddress.getAllByName(InetAddress.java:1120) at com.citrix.client.io.net.ip.s.a(Unknown Source) at com.citrix.client.io.net.ip.s.a(Unknown Source) at com.citrix.client.module.td.tcp.TCPTransportDriver.t(Unknown Source) at com.citrix.client.module.td.TransportDriver.run(Unknown Source) at java.lang.Thread.run(Thread.java:675) The systems administrator at the Library simply told me I needed to alter my Java security (I'd thought it was their server not accepting me) and someone suggested using cat << EOC > $java.policy grant codeBase "http://appserve.londonlibrary.co.uk" { permission java.security.AllPermission;} EOC which was no help at all. I've looked at 10 pages of Google output and taken a brief, appalled glance at the documentation supplied with Java, to no avail. I don't want to learn Java, just to get the damned thing to work. Can anyone explain a simple way of doing this? I'm using Java 1.7, Firefox 2.0, and Fedora 8.
  7. I expect that "thumbo" has got his computer up and running by now, but anyone else in the same situation should check out http://www.damnsmalllinux.org That wouldl be fine on a P3 with 64MB -- it would be content with a P1.
  8. For anyone wondering which distro to use, I'd suggest a visit to http://polishlinux.org/choose/quiz/ http://www.zegeniestudios.net/ldc/ You can answer questions about what you need and the script comes up with a recommendation.
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