Jump to content

1bit

Members
  • Content Count

    2
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by 1bit


  1. Hi,

    Im completely new to linux (other than trying a live cd), Ive been trying to install Linux Mint (on my dads PC) and Ubuntu Studio (on my PC) alongside Windows 10 following instructions on various web-pages...where I get stuck is when it tells me to select the FREE SPACE on the windows drive, it does not display the free space on the drives, it does show 2 lots of free space as 0MB and 1MB on the windows drive on both mine and my dads PC's - two seperate installations/instructions and exactly the same issues?

    all I can do is install it directly as a lone OS on a drive, Iam a noob and unfamiliar with linux partitioning etc

    can anyone help me install linux alongside windows 10?

     

    thanks


  2. Hi,

    me and my dad are wanting to switch from windows to linux, I have very little experience with Linux (ran a few live CD's years ago), I installed MINT on a VM and read that MINT and UBUNTU where the recommended choices on most websites, I went to install TOR to help my dad with it (no good to me) and when I ran the Linux installer file nothing happened, I then read that on Ubuntu based systems you have to install programs via several terminal commands, the instructions (below) where quite overwhelming just for a single program installation, I know using terminal is the core of using Linux, but Iam just wondering if there are easier to use distro's that would be better suited for 2 noobs that want to make a transition from Windows to Linux, one where programs can be installed a lot easier than the instructions below?? if possible?? - I do wish to use the terminal but surely it can be easier than that?

    thanks in advance

     

    Quote

    Option two: Tor on Ubuntu or Debian

    Do not use the packages in Ubuntu's universe. In the past they have not reliably been updated. That means you could be missing stability and security fixes.

    Raspbian is not Debian. Tor might run fine on the Raspberry Pi 2 / 3 but not the first generation Pi. These packages might be confusingly broken for Raspbian users, since Raspbian called their architecture armhf but Debian already has an armhf. See this post for details.

    Admin access: To install Tor you need root privileges. Below all commands that need to be run as root user like apt and dpkg are prepended with '#', while commands to be run as user with '$' resembling the standard prompt in a terminal. To open a root terminal you have several options: sudo su, or sudo -i, or su -i. Note that sudo asks for your user password, while su expects the root password of your system.

    apt-transport-tor: To use source lines with https:// in /etc/apt/sources.list the apt-transport-https package is required. Install it with

    
    # apt install apt-transport-https
    

    to enable all package managers using the libapt-pkg library to access metadata and packages available in sources accessible over https (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure).

     

    sources.list: You'll need to set up our package repository before you can fetch Tor. First, you need to figure out the name of your distribution. A quick command to run is lsb_release -c or cat /etc/debian_version. If in doubt about your Debian version, check the Debian website. For Ubuntu, ask Wikipedia.

    I run  Debian oldstable (jessie) Debian stable (stretch) Debian testing (buster) Debian unstable (sid) Ubuntu Trusty Tahr (14.04 LTS) Ubuntu Xenial Xerus (16.04 LTS) Ubuntu Artful Aardvark (17.10) Ubuntu Bionic Beaver (18.04 LTS) Ubuntu Cosmic Cuttlefish (18.10)  and want TorTor (from source) stableexperimental-0.3.4.xnightly-master

    You need to add the following entries to /etc/apt/sources.list or a new file in /etc/apt/sources.list.d/:

    
    deb https://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org stretch main
    deb-src https://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org stretch main
    

    Then add the gpg key used to sign the packages by running the following commands at your command prompt:

    
    # curl https://deb.torproject.org/torproject.org/A3C4F0F979CAA22CDBA8F512EE8CBC9E886DDD89.asc | gpg --import
    # gpg --export A3C4F0F979CAA22CDBA8F512EE8CBC9E886DDD89 | apt-key add -
    

     

    We provide a Debian package to help you keep our signing key current. It is recommended you use it. Install it with the following commands:

    
    # apt update
    # apt install tor deb.torproject.org-keyring
    
    

    Now Tor is installed and running. Move on to step two of the "Tor on Linux/Unix" instructions.

    The DNS name deb.torproject.org is actually a set of independent servers in a DNS round robin configuration. If you for some reason cannot access it you might try to use the name of one of its part instead. Try deb-master.torproject.org, mirror.netcologne.de or tor.mirror.youam.de.


    Use Apt over Tor

    deb.torproject.org is also served through via an onion service: http://sdscoq7snqtznauu.onion/

    To use Apt with Tor, the apt transport needs to be installed:

    
    # apt install apt-transport-tor
    

    Then replace the address in the lines added before with, for example:

    
    # For the stable version.
    deb tor://sdscoq7snqtznauu.onion/torproject.org <DISTRIBUTION> main
    
    # For the unstable version.
    deb tor://sdscoq7snqtznauu.onion/torproject.org tor-nightly-master-<DISTRIBUTION> main
    

    Now refresh your sources and try if it's still possible to install tor:

    
    # apt update
    # apt install tor
    

    See onion.torproject.org for all torproject.org onion addresses.

     

     

     

×
×
  • Create New...