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how to take a screenshot in linux


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How to take a screenshot in linux.

 

To take a screenshot of your beautiful desktop you could either try pressing the 'Prt Scr' key (print screen) on the keyboard.... or if that fails (and it sometimes does) then try this.

 

Open a console and type the following:-

import -window root filename.ext

Where filename.ext is the filename you want to give to your work of art. You can then check the directory you are in, and there will be the screenshot waiting for you.

 

If you want to add a delay BEFORE the shot is taken (so you can move stuff out of the way) then add a sleep command as follows:-

sleep 3s; import -window root screenshot.png

The above waits 3 seconds before taking the screenshot and saves it in PNG format. That's it, have fun :)

 

cheers

 

anyweb

Edited by anyweb
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  • 7 months later...

indeedy !

 

read my post again ;-)

 

To take a screenshot of your beautiful desktop you could either try pressing the 'Prt Scr' key (print screen) on the keyboard.... or if that fails (and it sometimes does) then try this.

 

 

i guess i should have pointed out that i use Gnome !

 

cheers

 

anyweb

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Hey there! Just wanted to add my two cents about using Gimp for Screen shots!!! I am currently using Gimp v2.3 and if you open gimp, the go to: File ----> Acquire ----> Screenshot, You will have a couple of choices if what you can do or when you can take a screen shot. This is helpful when you are using beryl or compiz and want to take a shot mid cube spin. In version 2.3 you can check the box that says take a screen shot of the entire screen, set it for 5 seconds so that you have time to rotate partway and then make sure you hold it still for less messed up pixelation. I like to this mainly in gimp because you can then take the screen shot and in the Gimp menu on top of the screen shot you can go: Image ----> Scale Image, You will then see a Sacle-Image box that shows the different measurements. I change the measurement from the default to percent and change the width to 50 and hit enter, then select the scale button at the bottom. Then I do a save as.. name my file, choose the best Quality, By reducing the size now you kill two birds with one stone, you make it smaller so that it's not so large in size, and you make it fit on the page where your posting it. Make sure that you rename it to .jpg instead of the gimp default .xcf. A similar screenshot at full resolution in the .xcf format yielded a 5.6 Mb image file.

 

Below is a screen shot that I took and reduced it by 50% and saved it as a jpg with quality equal to 100 percent. the total size for the file below was 364k.

 

 

f_screeniei_f661m_d35903dd.jpg

 

The different versions of gimp have different features available, so YMMV. Also gimp v2.3 is the development version (v2.2 is the current stable version ;-))

 

Hope this helps!!

 

ITnet7

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  • 5 years later...

They do - what were downloadable utilities of yesteryear now come included as standard on most modern distros.

 

Welcome to the forums, by the way!

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