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Hey Everyone,

 

I'm new to the forums. Been using Linux on and off over the years. But for the past month I've been starting to get more serious and investing more time in Linux. I have mostly used ubuntu but now I'm trying out debian now. I'm also interested in CentOS but since I'm still a Linux noob I think I've come to the write place. :)

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Hey Everyone,

 

I'm new to the forums. Been using Linux on and off over the years. But for the past month I've been starting to get more serious and investing more time in Linux. I have mostly used ubuntu but now I'm trying out debian now. I'm also interested in CentOS but since I'm still a Linux noob I think I've come to the write place. :)

 

Hi feedmebits -- welcome to the forums! We hope you enjoy your time here -- feel free to ask questions and share your own knowledges, experiences and screenshots in the relevant forums. :)

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thank you :) My knowledge isn't enough yet to help others out yet. But hopefull with the coming months it will become more so that I am able to help others too.

 

Hey Everyone,

 

I'm new to the forums. Been using Linux on and off over the years. But for the past month I've been starting to get more serious and investing more time in Linux. I have mostly used ubuntu but now I'm trying out debian now. I'm also interested in CentOS but since I'm still a Linux noob I think I've come to the write place. :)

 

Hi feedmebits -- welcome to the forums! We hope you enjoy your time here -- feel free to ask questions and share your own knowledges, experiences and screenshots in the relevant forums. :)

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welcome to the forums, and guess what, it's running on Centos !

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welcome to the forums, and guess what, it's running on Centos !

 

Awesome :D

 

I have a question that will fit this. I got more excited about Linux a few months ago and now I'm just start to get more serious in studying Linux, and am using a self study book to help me understand Linux basics better. At the moment I like working for ubuntu and debian better. I'm just wondering say I work alot with ubuntu/debian once I get enough experience and get the feel of working with Linux will it be easy to also work with a distro like CentOS/RHEL?

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I have a question that will fit this. I got more excited about Linux a few months ago and now I'm just start to get more serious in studying Linux, and am using a self study book to help me understand Linux basics better. At the moment I like working for ubuntu and debian better. I'm just wondering say I work alot with ubuntu/debian once I get enough experience and get the feel of working with Linux will it be easy to also work with a distro like CentOS/RHEL?

 

Absolutely.

 

While there are differences between the way different distributions and different families of Linux operating systems work (for example, RedHat/CentOS uses yum for package management, while Ubuntu/Debian ues aptitude/apt-get), the vast majority of the stuff you are learning will work exactly the same. The great thing is that once you do learn 'the feel' of Linux in general, it gets easier to then go and learn different distributions that work a little differently. Even amongst the different distros there is a lot of common ground, and a lot of important concepts that you pick up from one will apply to the other too.

 

I don't think there's any danger of getting 'locked in' to either Debian/Ubuntu or RedHat/CentOS as long as you're prepared to keep exploring different things every now and then and as new developments happen. :)

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If you've used ubuntu/debian, take a look at Mint - I've heard some good things about it, and it's based upon the DPKG system from debian so you may find it familiar.

 

I'd be interested in your comparisons between your experiences between ubuntu/debian familiarity and trying out an RPM-based distros (CentOS, Fedora). Would you be willing to knock up a quick article about things you found similar/different etc?

 

That would probably help new users put a few things into perspective!

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If you've used ubuntu/debian, take a look at Mint - I've heard some good things about it, and it's based upon the DPKG system from debian so you may find it familiar.

 

I'd be interested in your comparisons between your experiences between ubuntu/debian familiarity and trying out an RPM-based distros (CentOS, Fedora). Would you be willing to knock up a quick article about things you found similar/different etc?

 

That would probably help new users put a few things into perspective!

 

I don't have enough experience yet with either packaging system yet to write such an article; cause I still consider myself a beginner. But I as far as my experiences goes with deb and rpm goes. I think they are both pretty similar as in using them. In debian packages I've noticed I use sudo apt-get update package1 package2 (to install packages) or sudo apt-get update (to update packages). Here I'm running sudo and not logged in directly as root. Or I can install software from the software center via the graphic user interface. With rpm packaging system I've noticed I have to log into root first before I can install a package using su- su or su - root. Once logged into root I have can run yum install package1 package2 or yum install update (to install update packages). Something else I've noticed is that you can download package via the command line via wget location of package. I can also do this with rpm packages with a different command. or you can download .rpm or.deb versions of software for both.Difference I did notice is with rpm you are able to search for package groups/types, and then install the whole group of packages and with deb you have you to edit sources.list before being able to install a package with sudo apt-get install. These are things I've noticed so far.

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btw just wanted to let you admins know I really like the forums here. Great Job!! Better than alot of other forums I've been too :D

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Well, have to point out that what you wrote there is ideal for our forums - or one of our blogs. If you're willing to document your difference as a diary, it could help other noobs.

 

Just another point: sudo works under RPM-based systems, as well as debian-based, just that ubuntu adds the initial user into the sudoers file and disables the root account, forcing that initial user to sudo everything. It is possible (and advised) to do the same thing under CentOS/Fedora/etc and disable root login, just that it's not on by default.

 

Compare /etc/sudoers files between both distros, you'll see what I mean.

 

I'm more familiar with the yum/rpm methods (I wrote an article for the forums and just noticed I've not finished it! Damn!) but when someone argued that yum was an apt ripoff... I had to admit they were right in many cases!

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I will make a diary/blog as soon as I have a normal internet connection working at home :)

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