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./network start shows error RTNETLINK answers: File exists Error adding address [ip]


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I'm only partially new to Linux. I'm running Fedora 11. I've just set up two machines, I thought to be identical. Evidently I missed something. I had some problems getting the network started on the second machine, and I must have forgotten a name change somewhere. Anyway, after doing lot's of comparisons between the boxes, editing and renaming and re-linking the ifcfg-GigaStorey file, they are both functioning. The problem is that whenever I start or restart the network on box 2, it reports the following error:

 

Bringing up interface GigaStorey: RTNETLINK answers: File exists 
Error adding address 192.168.1.6 for eth0.
                                 [ OK ] 

 

The file ifcfg-GigaStorey is linked in the following directories

/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts

/etc/sysconfig/networking/devices

/etc/sysconfig/networking/profiles/default

 

The contents of the file on box 2 (error) are:

# Networking Interface
DEVICE=eth0
HWADDR=00:10:C6:A3C:C7
ONBOOT=yes
IPADDR=192.168.1.6
BOOTPROTO=none
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
TYPE=Ethernet
GATEWAY=192.168.1.1
DNS1=192.168.1.1
IPV6INIT=no
USERCTL=no
PREFIX=24
NAME="System eth0"
UUID=52c359b4-bce1-4ee9-49f8-1928b302e041

 

The same file on box #1 (No errors here) is:

# Networking Interface
DEVICE=eth0
HWADDR=00:10:C6:B2:5D:F8
ONBOOT=yes
IPADDR=192.168.1.5
BOOTPROTO=none
NETMASK=255.255.255.0
TYPE=Ethernet
GATEWAY=192.168.1.1
DNS1=192.168.1.1
IPV6INIT=no
USERCTL=no
PREFIX=24
NAME="System eth0"
UUID=5fb06bd0-0bb0-7ffb-45f1-d6edd65f3e03

 

Like I said, it's not super critical, just annoying. The networking comes up ok, but the error is puzzling. I figure if I learn what this problem is I'll be one step closer to my Linux beanee. As always, the fates will smile on you for your gracious help!

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  • 3 weeks later...

The file ifcfg-GigaStorey is linked in the following directories

/etc/sysconfig/network-scripts

/etc/sysconfig/networking/devices

/etc/sysconfig/networking/profiles/default

Just a point here - the first file is the important one (or rather, the first directory).

 

When Linux boots, it tries to get a specific networking profile, then applies that as a current profile. That's what the third and second directories are, respectively. It's safer not to touch those, since they're likely to be overwritten at reboot. Change the ones in the first dir and the second/third should pick them up upon networking reload/restart.

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