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Again, I'm just getting ready to dip my toes in the Linux water. I've settled on a couple of distros that I want to begin with, but I still have some basic questions.

I don't have any specific computer needs that require Linux. I run a small business and I'm interested in Linux because of the open-source and free philosophy. I also like to tinker with computers a bit, but not to the extent that I write code or anything like that. That being said, I need to be able to hook up peripherals such as printers, cameras, storage devices, etc for my business. I realize that I may have to put some time in at the beginning to get everything dialed in, but will I have compatibility issues in the long term if I run a distro like Ubuntu?

 

Also, I'll be getting a new computer soon. Are there specific new computers that do better with Linux than others. Thanks, Bman

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Again, I'm just getting ready to dip my toes in the Linux water. I've settled on a couple of distros that I want to begin with, but I still have some basic questions.

I don't have any specific computer needs that require Linux. I run a small business and I'm interested in Linux because of the open-source and free philosophy. I also like to tinker with computers a bit, but not to the extent that I write code or anything like that. That being said, I need to be able to hook up peripherals such as printers, cameras, storage devices, etc for my business. I realize that I may have to put some time in at the beginning to get everything dialed in, but will I have compatibility issues in the long term if I run a distro like Ubuntu?

 

Also, I'll be getting a new computer soon. Are there specific new computers that do better with Linux than others. Thanks, Bman

 

When I buy a Linux Computer I focus on network, processor/RAM, harddisk.

 

Linux is a networking operating system, it is great for all things network, make sure the ethernet is 1000Mbps (usually called 1Gethernet). You may not have 1Gpbs Ethernet routed today but you will.

 

Linux does not require ultra-fast processors but you want to pick something that is x86 processor based with 64-bit architecture (AMD-Athlon64 or Intel-Pentium) and a relatively common motherboard so support for peripherals is not an issue.

 

Memory is cheap, 2GB RAM.

 

Harddisk: SATA is the nascent technology, SATA-I=1.5Gbps, SATA-II=3.0Gbps(max)

 

I am not particularly concerned about the video card since I always run VNC. I only need the Video Card for boot and initial installation. I then move the Linux Box into a closet with excellent network access and run everything remotely. I can do this from anywhere on the planet.

 

That all said, you could dust off an old PC from a few years ago and install Debian/FedoraCore/Ubuntu/...

It will work great with the older hardware. That is were Linux/GNU shines. It doesn't need but can use a 256MB Graphics Processor just to run like Vista. It doesn't need but can use 2GB RAM. It doesn't need but can use 750GB Harddrive.

 

I scavenge 2-3 year old PC at work and load Linux/GNU on them creating a server farm.

I just need AC power and an 100Mbps Ethernet Connection and I am good to go.

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Again, I'm just getting ready to dip my toes in the Linux water. I've settled on a couple of distros that I want to begin with, but I still have some basic questions.

I don't have any specific computer needs that require Linux. I run a small business and I'm interested in Linux because of the open-source and free philosophy. I also like to tinker with computers a bit, but not to the extent that I write code or anything like that. That being said, I need to be able to hook up peripherals such as printers, cameras, storage devices, etc for my business. I realize that I may have to put some time in at the beginning to get everything dialed in, but will I have compatibility issues in the long term if I run a distro like Ubuntu?

 

Also, I'll be getting a new computer soon. Are there specific new computers that do better with Linux than others. Thanks, Bman

 

When I buy a Linux Computer I focus on network, processor/RAM, harddisk.

 

Linux is a networking operating system, it is great for all things network, make sure the ethernet is 1000Mbps (usually called 1Gethernet). You may not have 1Gpbs Ethernet routed today but you will.

 

Linux does not require ultra-fast processors but you want to pick something that is x86 processor based with 64-bit architecture (AMD-Athlon64 or Intel-Pentium) and a relatively common motherboard so support for peripherals is not an issue.

 

Memory is cheap, 2GB RAM.

 

Harddisk: SATA is the nascent technology, SATA-I=1.5Gbps, SATA-II=3.0Gbps(max)

 

I am not particularly concerned about the video card since I always run VNC. I only need the Video Card for boot and initial installation. I then move the Linux Box into a closet with excellent network access and run everything remotely. I can do this from anywhere on the planet.

 

That all said, you could dust off an old PC from a few years ago and install Debian/FedoraCore/Ubuntu/...

It will work great with the older hardware. That is were Linux/GNU shines. It doesn't need but can use a 256MB Graphics Processor just to run like Vista. It doesn't need but can use 2GB RAM. It doesn't need but can use 750GB Harddrive.

 

I scavenge 2-3 year old PC at work and load Linux/GNU on them creating a server farm.

I just need AC power and an 100Mbps Ethernet Connection and I am good to go.

Thanks. Can you explain more what you mean by "networking operating system" and does this have anything to do with linux not being susceptible to viruses? Sorry about the quoting the entire thread, not sure how to get out of that. Thanks again.

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When Ifsuser said "linux is a networking operating system", he meant that it is good if you ever need to expand to your own LAN. Linux was originally started to make a server/mainframe system (Unix) available to desktop computers; Windows started on desktops and then migrated to servers.

 

As for viruses, I think two things are involved. Firstly, Linux is just less susceptible than Windows -- a matter of design. Secondly, the sort of people who write viruses seem to be Windows users!

 

Let us know which distro you go for and how you do.

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